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6 Reasons why people struggle to say no.

As much as we love people, there are challenges with saying no to those we love. This article gives the six reasons why we struggle to say no to those we love.

Having people in our lives is one of the most important need we have as a human species. There are some activities we do subconsciously to make sure that we keep the people in our lives at all cost. The series’ and movies we watch have sold us a perverted image about the nature of relationships; this has made decision making and commitment difficult for many people because of the images that are embedded in our minds. Additionally, people cannot say no to those they love because in all honesty they can’t picture the ramifications of that simple word, “no”.

Is it bad to say to say no to those you love?

I am not a perfect being nor am I a relationship expert, but I can say that there are some truths that I have learned about saying no to those you love. One of the truth is that saying no is not always bad. The key to understanding that short statement is in understanding why people actually want to say no to someone.

We all have values, some of these values we know well and most of these values we are not aware of, because they are normally subconscious. The easiest way to realise the difference between the values we know and the values we don’t know is by answering these questions: 1. What are your values? 2. What makes you happy and what makes you angry? These 2 questions are important because they are often the foundation for why we want to say no.

We don’t say no, just to say no to people. We say no because there are values we are always trying to protect. Like two children who are ready to fight, we are forever drawing a line hoping that people will not dare to cross the line. This is one of the main reason why most people just feel uneasy with agreeing to something they were asked to do, because in that moment that line could have been crossed. So we say no because we want to protect our values from being overthrown; we also say no because we don’t want to be taken advantage of. Remember that abuse is inevitable when there is no sense of responsibility in any given relationship, so in the end we say no because we want people to act responsibly towards us.

With all this this in mind, saying no is still not easy. Here are some of the reasons we find it difficult to say no:

  1. Fear being abandoned.

I remember a few years back, this was my biggest struggle with saying no. I had a friend who was like family and by family I mean this person was like my mother’s child who was born to just complement me in most areas of life. But I could never say no to this person because I feared that they would end the relationship and I would be stranded trying to find a new friend. So, without being aware, I compromised so much that my character started changing in unhealthy ways.

 

This is common in many relationships, where people are willing to let values be overthrown because they fear losing this person. This false motive of being appreciated if one of the reasons people struggle to say no to those they love or those that simply do a lot for them. They trade their values for love and simply feel a sense of abandonment if they don’t sense the love being given back to them. In very few words this is among many reasons why many High School students struggle with peer pressure. In the end, people are not willing to fight for their values because they fear being lonely.

 

  1. Fear the anger of those they love.

In all honesty, I don’t like conflict in a relationship. If I could have my way, I would pay people not be angry at me. This was one of my struggles as a leader. I failed to set limits to people I was leading with because of how everyone reacted the last time I said no and set a limit. Surprisingly, this was one of the main reason I never wanted to say no to my mom while growing up. I mean, I would do pointless things just to make sure that there is no conflict between my mom and I. Every time I would say yes –when I really wanted to say no- I would get the fastest flashback of how my mom can be when she is unhappy with something. A lot has changed now and I’ll be sure to write an article about all the changes and how they came about.

 

So, the pictures that we have of people being mad at us, make us very careful when it comes to saying no to those people. So people struggle to say no because they can’t stand the anger expressed by those they love towards them. And once again, they would trade their values so that they don’t see the other side of an individual.

 

  1. Fear being seen as selfish.

“You are so, so selfish.” These words are the words I never wanted to hear from someone I love. It’s like they come at you like a fiery dart piercing the heart and most of the time we never expect these words.

 

Like I said in the opening statement, we are created to survive this thing called life with relationships present in our lives. We always out to protect our values and in doing so it does not make sense to say something like, “I really love you and I would like to, but I’m going to have to say no to that.” Many people then think that because we love people so much, we must always say yes to them and their needs. And when people don’t say yes, they label them as selfish.

 

  1. Feeling guilty

I always thought about what it would be like saying no to someone and then the person cries on the spot or seeing the person emotionally withdrawn from the environment we would be sharing then. This was always tormenting. I soon realised that the amount of power we give people often affects in ways we can actually control. And this helped me get over feeling guilty about saying no because I could not determine how much power people gave me in their lives. The sad truth is that, “We are the captains of our own ships.”

 

Many people are motivated by this guilt feeling. In their eyes, it’s the most negative emotion they could ever feel and will literally avoid saying no because they don’t want to feel bad afterwards. It’s like in all their actions they are simply trying to earn a sense of goodness towards those they love. They keep saying yes to avoid the possible feeling of guilt.

 

  1. Payback time.

I love the legal drama Suits. I was subconsciously affected by it, because every time I would help out a friend there was always clichéd disclaimer saying, Just remember that now you owe me one.” I enjoyed this until I noticed how I didn’t like it when people said it to me, because most of the time people would want a repayment of their favours at really awkward and difficult times. I could only imagine how others felt when I did the same to them.

 

Most people struggled to say no to people who have done them good at a certain time. When they receive their favours, there is normally a guilt message attached to it. These guilt messages come up in words like, “We need to square out that favour.” Or “Don’t forget, you owe me one.” As honest as these words sound, they make it difficult for people to say no because they feel the need to pay back their debts. This can also come from parents saying words like, “Back in the days, I never had things as easy as you do now.”

 

  1. See other people’s problems as really big.  

Growing up, there were many problems that I never dealt with and every time someone had a challenge in the area I never dealt with, I would always try and be the biggest help in that person’s life. Surely this was unhealthy, but I was never aware of it, because I really enjoyed that good feeling that came with being a helper.

 

Many times people still struggle to say no because they have not dealt with their personal failures and losses. When this happens, people feel like they can’t say no because the other person’s problem is really big, so big they can’t imagine saying no to this person.

 

The point in all of this is to recognise a very important element in relationships, freedom. We need to realise that when we don’t have the freedom to choose, then there is a degree of unfairness in that particular relationship. More importantly we need to recognise how we communicate with others, whether or not we leave people with a choice is very important in healthy relationships. It creates a sense of responsibility and it avoids statements like, “I guess you leave me with no choice.” Which is a general red flag in relationships. In most of my relationships, I have maintained freedom by remaining honest about how I feel and what I value.

I encourage you to talk about these points. I think you’ll even learn more about people’s values when there is open communication. I’ll be sure to write an article about how to say no in the near future. In all your relationships, I wish you all the best.

Feel free to leave your comments about this article, don’t forget to share it with your friends and stay tuned for next week’s article. Thank you for reading The Common-Line.

Leonard Lebere

 

 

 

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Boundaries- A short book review by Leonard Lebere

The book Boundaries written by Dr. Henry Cloud and Dr. John Townsend is arguably amongst the best read in the category of relationships. I am not an author, but I think I would be convinced about a book if it sold over 2 million copies and won a Golden Medallion Award since published in 1992.

How did I come across Boundaries?

People stumble upon books in different ways. I was about 15 years old and I spent most of my time during the holidays reading about my topics of interest at the time. Somehow, at age 15 I was really drawn to psychology and neuroscience, I had a belief that, “The way to understanding relationships is found in understanding people.” I then came across a video on YouTube that introduced me to the concept of boundaries and even in this time, I did not know that there is a book on this concept. A year later, I was in a bookshop looking for books to read reviews on and the world stood still as this title caught my eye. Boundaries was the title and obviously, my frustration was, “Why didn’t that lady I watched on YouTube not make reference to this book.” 2 days later I owned the book and in my 16-year-old mind I was on my way to becoming a relationship expert (I am still far from that at age 20). Just having this book gave me a desire to talk to people about relationships.

What is Boundaries about?

“When to say yes. How to say no. Take control of your life.” When I read this on the front page of the book, I was not sure whether the book would deliver, but after reading the book, I realised that, that line was a simplified explanation of what the entire book deals with. Boundaries –a book written by two very observant psychologists – is a book about understanding relationships and how to grow them in a healthy way. It deals more with taking control of your life, limiting the amount of people that take advantage of you and how to express your no towards people (friends, family and co-workers) in your immediate world.

Responsibility is one of the main themes of the book. The analogy of two people who own houses and have a property line dividing the houses. When the tree growing from one person’s house grows into the other person’s property line it is the responsibility of the one who planted the tree to make sure that it firstly stays within his property line and does not affect others because his lack of maintenance. Therefore, in terms of relationships the book teaches us how to act responsibly in the setting of a relationship and how to identify and limit the irresponsible people.

What did I like about Boundaries?

  1. Insight

It is not every day where we get to hear a psychologist talk about their experience with patients and some of the common challenges people face in any form of relationship. Dr. Cloud and Dr. Townsend identify the problems, then they explain why these problems arise and before you know it, they finally give a solution to the relational problems. The book gives insight to common struggles people face or could face when they act a particular way. Here are a few lines about overcontrol. “Overcontrol occurs when otherwise loving parents try to protect children from making mistakes by having too-strict rules and limits… while a major responsibility of parents is to control and protect, they must make room for their children to make mistake. Remember we learn by ‘constant use’. Overcontrolled children are subject to dependency. They also have problems taking risks and being creative.

 

  1. Broad spectrum of topics.

Although the book is about relationships, it does not focus on one form of relationship. The topics within the book range from family and friends to romantic relationships and colleagues. This element keeps the book exciting and impossible to put down, because it gives you an opportunity to see where Boundaries are crucial in the life that you are living. “Realise your limits, and make sure that you do not allow your work to control your life. Say yes to the best, and sometimes you may need to say no the good. Work will grow to fill the time you have set aside for it. If a meeting does not have an agenda with time limits, discussions could be endless. Allot time for certain things and then keep your limits. You will work smarter and like your work more. “From the chapter dealing with Boundaries and Work.

 

  1. Paints a relatable picture of modern life.

The book is divided into three parts and I would call them the before, the during and the after. I love the book because you read-through it like a map filled with discovery. In the beginning of the book, it starts with an introduction to life and the burdens that come with living life, the book then continues with an exciting part two which gives you an idea of the challenges you could face as you try to apply boundaries in your personal life. Furthermore, the book paints the picture fully in the last part that shows you how your life should look like –more or less- if you have boundaries in place.

 

  1. Teaches you about you.

The lovely thing about Boundaries is that it does not directly instruct you to think about your life and aspects of your upbringing, instead, as you read the stories shared you get to discover some of the answers you have always had about your personal strengths and weaknesses. One of the things I learned about the root of not being content with the status quo of my life was a simple thing I overlooked, envy. “The problem with envy is that it focuses outside our boundaries, onto others. If we are focusing on what others have or have accomplished, we are neglecting our responsibilities and will ultimately have an empty heart. People are questioning themselves instead of others… Your envy should be a sign to you that you are lacking something.” This piece was from a chapter called, ‘The ten laws of boundaries.’   

 

How have I been living my life after reading Boundaries?

The reality of reading the book from start to finish is that the changes are not instantaneous. In my life, the confidence to say no to those who try to take advantage of me is growing. My friends would be able to testify about how I am always speaking about the topic of boundaries and why it is important to have limits towards people. After reading the book, I can say I have a better understanding of people and how they form and break relationships. I have built deep, meaningful friendships with people that meet my relational needs and understand my personal values (boundaries being one of the values). Most of the lessons I have learned from the book I have taken time to teach people in my immediate circle. I do not regret buying this book; it gave me a different perspective on relationships. The book is never far from me, every week I take time to remind myself of lessons that really stood out.

 

Who should read Boundaries?

This book is surely for people who want learn more about how relationships are managed, maintained and messed-up I would recommend Boundaries to everyone who is in serious relationships and to everyone who has a desire to build density relationships. Moreover, not forgetting those individuals who do not feel like they are in control of their lives and have trouble saying no, because they uphold the image of being ‘too nice’. Ultimately, this book is those who want to live a life of love, freedom, responsibility and service to others.

 

Feel free to leave comments if you have read the book or even if you are currently reading the book. I will also answer any questions you might have.

Thank you for reading. Hope you come back for more blogs.

Leonard Lebere

Reflective Questions- Personal questions to ask yourself when thinking about the past and planning for the future.

Reflective Questions-

The saddest about being a millennial is we are easily pressured to live a life of ‘duration’ instead of living a life of ‘donation’. Duration in the sense that we just want to live long enough to become rich and famous, but there is greater reality, where this life will reward us for the donation we made to it. This is my reason for writing these blogs, I simply want to live a life full of donation.

Reflection is a key trait to have. I use it as a tool for improvement and tracking whether or not I am getting better at whatever I do. When we think about the past and plan for the future, reflection is the tool that ensures that we never make the same mistake twice. “When we do not reflect on experiences, it becomes like receiving the test and never learning the lesson.” I highlighted the importance of reflection in the last blog and now I’m going to share questions you can ask yourself when you take time to reflect.

Relationships are important. We need to take time and reflect on our relations with people or else we will live with a lot of frustration thinking that people don’t understand us, when the actual problem could be that we don’t understand ourselves. The questions are only 10, the most obvious thing that will happen while you read these question is that you’ll realise that you can add more questions based on what you are reading.

For Relationships of all sorts:

  1. Do I value people?
  2. Do people know that I value them?
  3. How do I show that I value them?
  4. Am I a ‘plus’ or a ‘minus’ in most of my relationships?
  5. What evidence do I have to confirm my opinion?
  6. What is the love language of the people I love?
  7. How can I serve them best?
  8. Do I need to forgive someone in my life?
  9. Who should I take time to thank?
  10. Who in my life should be receiving my time?

Let us get into the questions.

  1. Do I value people?

For many people including me, this would be easy to answer. The challenge came when I started thinking about the word ‘value’. Materialistically speaking, I have a specific attitude to everything I count as valuable. I know where my valuable things are, I know their conditions and if someone took them away for a while, I would feel the absence of whatever that might be. So when I answered ‘yes’ to this question, I discovered that I actually do value people because of my attitude towards them.

  1. Do people know I value them?

With question, it was a ‘yes’ for my family and friends but a ‘not-really’ for my fellow students and colleagues. I have many people that given some of the best advice ever and outside of that the life they live is extremely inspirational. My mistake (which I am in the process of changing) is that I never told or affirmed those people for their presence in my life. This is why it was a ‘not-really’ for other people.

  1. How do I show it?

I affirm. I always take time to send people I value long messages on a random day and I always make a big deal out of their birthdays. In their absence, I will always talk about their impact in my life and how excited I am about their futures.

  1. Am I a ‘plus’ or a ‘minus’ in most relationships?

I considered myself to be a plus. I had to think about how people react to my presence, the questions that people ask me and the way most of my family and friends have affirmed me.

  1. What evidence do I have to confirm my opinion?

When I think about who I am to people, I realised that I add value to the relationships that I have. As much as people are always teaching me something, I take time to learn and in return teach them. I do not let my relationships be one sided, but instead I always try to play my part.

  1. What is the love language of the people that I love?

For this question I had to remember the book, ‘The 5 Love languages by Garry Chapman.” The 5 ways in which people feel loved are, Quality time, Acts of service, Physical Touch, Receiving of Gifts and Words of affirmation. So for me the most common ones were Quality time and Words of affirmation.

  1. How can I serve them best?

Based on the love languages expressed by the people I love, spending time with those with a love language of quality time and simply affirming those with the love language of words of affirmation.

  1. Do I need to forgive someone in my life?

I was never really bothered by what people do to me, I found it quit easy to forgive. The person I need to forgive was myself. For all the opportunities I missed and the time I had to do certain things, I always lived on the back foot of my own life. Forgiving myself gave me the freedom I have always wanted.

  1. Who should I take time to thank?

After going through a very tough season, the support I received from my family was the best. I had to take time to call and text all of them for their support and patience.

  1. Who in my life should be receiving more of my time?

Again, as much as I wanted this question to go to many of my friends, it had to be my family for this one.

This is simply a template for reflection, there other questions that you can ask yourself and there are questions that you can leave out from the 10 that I have shared. When answering these questions, do not just think about them, take time are write down your answers to these questions.

“Why? Because you will discover that what you think after you write the answer is different from what you thought before you wrote it. Writing helps you to discover what you truly know, think, and believe.”

Do not just be a duration in a relationship, be a donation.

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Reflection- Make it important

Reflection- Make it important

We are all different, we come from extremely vast backgrounds and we have been exposed to different environments. With that in mind, there are some important changes in our journeys that I believe will work for most people. One of those things is, ‘Reflecting’.

When people hear the word reflection, the first thing they think about is a Journal or Diary, where you have to write about your secrets and the people you hate. Trust me, I was one of those people, because that’s is the first thing I thought I was going to do when I started reading the chapter of ‘The Law of Reflection’ in John Maxwell’s book, The 15 Invaluable laws of growth. To my surprise it was really different, it was as if that Chapter was tailored for me. I acknowledge that some points you might not agree with, but those same points could be relevant for 100 other people.

Reflection is simply allowing the growth you are experiencing to catch up with where you are in life. This sounds confusing, but once explored you’ll realise that you have been doing it in some or other way, but you were maybe just not aware of it. Like I highlighted that Reflection is simply allowing the growth you are experiencing to catch up with where you are in life. 

“When we reflect, what we reflect upon changes into insight.” 

I asked one of my friends, “How will you know that this year is going to be a good year? How will you know if you have grown from 2016 to 2017? How can you be assured that the same mistakes you did 2016, you won’t, by chance, repeat them this year?” I didn’t ask these questions because I wanted to get my friend thinking, I asked these questions because I personally wanted to make sure that I don’t see, “2016 Reloaded”, where I just go around in circles without realising that I am getting better in something. The key to my questions, came weeks later, the Key was to reflect. The spectrum of reflecting was not only limited to my emotions, but also reflecting on on events, time usage, vocabulary and how I spoke to people, financial management, how I managed my relationships, how I approached Leadership and whether or not my relationship with the Father was deepening.

This really sounds like an easy thing to do, but I didn’t make it a priority hence I missed out on an opportunity to grow personally in the past few years. 

“When we don’t reflect on experiences, it becomes like receiving a test and never learning the lesson.”

 At this point you can just stop, because that’s the most important thing about reflection, “Learning the Lesson.” I believe that reflection should be more valuable than motivation and encouragement. 

“Reflection makes our lives better, because we get to understand the significance of events and we can be better prepared should they happen again.” 

The thing I find cool about reflection is that it allows you to teach others from the wisdom that you might have gained from your experience, because your thinking expands when you pause with intention. Sometimes we need to let a minute thought be an hour of talk. 

“When you are able to create a lonely place in the middle of your actions and concerns, your successes and failures can slowly lose the power over you.”-Henri Nouwen.

 “At the end of each day, you should be able to play back the tapes of your performance. The results should either applaud you or prod you”-Jim Rohn. 

“Successful people ask better questions, and as a result, get better answers.”-Anthony Robbins.

I love how some quotes just give context to certain topics.

AThe main question would now be, “But then how can I reflect as an individual?” John Maxwell answers this question in the best way. He talks about using the “4 I”. Something stood out for me, “If someone is going down the wrong road, he doesn’t need motivation to speed up. He needs to stop.” If you are one of those people the following can apply for you.

1. Investigate.

This is the first step, ask the hard questions. This is something I dealt with in the first article on GROWTH  I had to ask myself those uncomfortable questions about my future. “What kind of life do you want?” “Is your way of life supporting the desire you have?” “Is the company you keep drawing you close to your future?” “Are you reading books on topics of your strengths?” These are some of the questions I asked myself because I needed to know where I am currently.

 Galileo said, “All truths are easy to understand once they are discovered. The point is to discover them. That takes investigation.”

2. Incubate.

Is more like meditation. It’s the part where you really think about the questions you have asked yourself and allowing those questions to bother your mind. When you incubate, you are reloading your ammo to tackle the questions you have. When I started incubating, I started remembering and thinking about stories, quotes, books, topics of talk, etc. Stuff like, “You are the average of five people you are always with.” “If you don’t create the future you want, you must endure the future you get.” “My people perish for a lack of knowledge” “Impossible is in the dictionary of fools” These are some of the quotes that gave me direction.

3. Illuminate.

“Aha”. This is the primary reaction of illuminating. It is when you realise how something gave you poor results even though you had a high investment on them. 

“At the end of each day, you should play back the tapes of your performance. The results should either applaud you or prod you.”-Jim Rohn. 

This is where we get to realise where we really went wrong and what the plan might be to improve how and where we went wrong.

4. Illustrate.

This is the action part. The part where you realise what went wrong and then making it a mission to act on improving on what went wrong. A business plan on paper will never turn into a business unless someone implements that idea. Success is the fruit of action. 

“No plan is worth the paper it is printed on unless it starts you doing something.”-William Danforth

In summary these are the 4 Pillars of reflection for me. Just remember that when you reflect, what you reflect upon changes into insight and “When we don’t reflect on experiences, it becomes like receiving a test and never learning the lesson.” Please don’t forget to leave your comments and Questions below. 

GROWTH-Make The most out of 2017.

BEFORE YOU READ THE BLOG, PLEASE READ THIS. Before I get to the actual article, I would really just like to share something to whoever is reading this. I have had my blog for months and for a very long I was looking for the “Correctness” of blogging. This would mainly be stuff like, grammar, punctuation, structure and all the technical aspects about Blogging that make the best bloggers the best. I was too focused on these technical things that I did not even end up sharing a single blog, even though I had a ton of articles burning in my heart. I realised that I don’t have 1 million followers, I don’t even own a blog yet, because of this I figured that I don’t really have to pretend like I have 1 million followers. This really became my motivation to share this first article with people. It might not be a million people but I guess that it will have an Impact on whoever will read it. Want I want to say to many people is that, as important as timing is, don’t be like me and only post a blog 3 Years later after having the idea. Just go for it. It’s not always about the achievement, but the journey you go through, makes the achievement meaningful. Enjoy the article.

GROWTH-  Making the most out of 2017

I’m not sharing new/raw content, I’m going to be sharing my thoughts and great points from the Book I’m currently reading. The book is titled, ‘The 15 Invaluable Laws of Growth’. The book was written by a man I well respect when it comes to the subject of the Leadership, John C Maxwell.

Chapter 1 of this book is titled, “The Law of Intentionality: Growth does not just happen.”  After reading the first line, I asked myself, “Don’t we just grow because we have been doing it for a while.” The answer to my question was answered in the First line of this chapter:

 

 

 “Do you have a plan for your personal growth?” Curt Kampmeier, the man who asked me the question, waited patiently for my response. It was a question that would change my life.

 

Right after reading this Line I picked a notebook and pen. I told myself that I need to make notes because this book will most probably have lessons I can apply for the next 50 Years and I was right. “We often say that we want to grow as individuals, but the question is, where is the plan for growing?” While reading this question, it felt so personal, because I had a desire to grow but I did not have the plan to grow.

James Allen said, “People are anxious to improve their circumstances, but are unwilling to improve themselves, they therefore remain bound.”

When I read this specific quote I thought about my High School life where I constantly had a desire to improve my academic performace, but I never realised that I would have had a different outcome had I improved myself as a learner. I believe that there are many people who have a circumstance they want changed and they can really get a different result if they improve themselves while trying to see the circumstance change.

John Maxwell shared ‘8 gaps’ that hinder many people (hindered me as well) from growing.

1.  The Assumption Gap– “ I Assume that I will automatically grow”

“We don’t improve by being in ‘it’ longer, we improve by being intentional about it.”

This statement answered the question of whether or we get better because we have been doing it for a while.

2. The Knowledge Gap– “I do not know how to grow”

Loretta Staples says, “If you are clear with what you want, the world responds with clarity.”

It’s much better to plan your growth intentionally. You decide where youneed or want to grow, you choose what you will learn, and you follow through with discipline going at the pace you set. As an individual, you will know the truth and the truth will set you free. Knowing how to grow not only helped me, but it empowered me to encourage others around me to grow in the areas they desired to grow.

3. The Timing Gap– “It’s not the right time to begin”

The law of diminishing intent says, “The longer you wait on something that you should do now, the greater the odds of you actually doing it.”

You will never get much done unless you do it before you are ready. I think I was programmed to desire the ideal situation to start with something I have always wanted to do, but like this blog, sometimes we delay because we are waiting for the perfect time.

4. The Mistake Gap-“I’m Afraid of Making Mistakes.”

The question is simple, “How many things would you attempt if you knew that you won’t fail?” I would have published like 20 Bestselling Books at age 19, but I feared making mistakes I would maybe not be able to turn back from. What do you think, you would have done?

5. The Perfection Gap-“I Have to Find the Best Way Before I Start”

“Sometimes we just have to start to find the best way.” This is the rule I am applying now as I write this blog. I breaking the mindset of, “The perfect start.”

6. The Inspiration Gap—“I Don’t Feel Like Doing It” Inspiration. This I what I grew up wanting every day of my life, I wanted someone who would give me a reason to do what I love every day.

Jerome Bruner observed, “You’re likely to act yourself into felling than to feel yourself into action.”

This quote got me reading for about 3 Hours a day, for weeks, even though every time I started reading, I didn’t feel like it, but I enjoyed the reading because the feeling came later. “When you start reaping the benefits of growing, you will have enough reasons to stay in the growth process.”

7. The Comparison Gap-“Others Are Better Than I Am” This is what I have always feared when it comes to blogging. I personally did not like the fact that many people can impact people far quicker than I can. I learned that, “There will always be people better than me. I have to get used to being uncomfortable.”

8.  The Expectation Gap-“I Thought It Would Be Easier Than This” Jim Rohn said, “You cannot change your destination overnight but you can change your direction overnight.” As a starting blogger there is a place I would like to be but I need to choose the direction that might get me there.

I believe many can relate to some of the gaps shared above, we all face different challenges every day, the question then becomes how do we approach this dilemma of growth?

1. Ask Big Questions in 2017

Try and change the question from, “How long will this growth thing go?” to, “How far can I actually I actually go with growing intentionally?” If you have a desire to improve in a specific thing or maybe you just want to start something new, ask yourself, “What are the different gaps stopping from getting on the Journey to where I want to be.”

2. Do it now in 2017 

Make it your mission this year to learn how to develop urgency. “Later is a dream killer.” Not many people will have magic moments that will give them the ultimate start, so push yourself to do all that you desire now.

3. Face the fear factor 2017

“Face the fear factor by feeding your faith and starving your fears.” The Unknown World is great, it takes great confidence to take it on without being slowed down.

4. Go from accidental to Intentional in 2017 

Eleanor Roosevelt said, “One’s Philosophy is not best expressed in words; it is expressed in the choices one makes. In the long run, we shape our lives.”

I learned that, “We must constantly go out of your way to seize growth opportunity.”

BE INTENTIONAL.

I hope what I shared challenges you the same way it challenged me. May your 2017 be a year of great EXPLOSION